Best Selling Red Wines Of Australia

Top 5 Red Wines of Australia Sold Online

Popular Red Wines Sold Online in Australia.

Visit https://justwines.com.au/red-wine for viewing full wines listing.

McGuigan Private Bin Merlot South Eastern Australia
Emmetts Crossing Cabernet Sauvignon 2007 Western Australia Mcwilliams Inheritance Shiraz 2013 New South Wales Mcwilliams Hanwood Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2013 South Eastern Australia
Night Harvest Reserve Shiraz 2007 Margaret River
Mystery Shiraz 2005
McGuigan Signature Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 South Eastern Australia
Perridom Shiraz 2010 South Eastern Australia
Peter Lehmann Art ‘N’ Soul Cabernet Sauvignon 2012
Barossa Valley Sun View Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 South Eastern Australia
Emmetts Crossing Reserve Cabernet Merlot Clare Valley
Night Harvest Reserve Shiraz 2008 Margaret River
Nut House Shiraz 2015 Mclaren Vale
Wild Wood Cabernet Merlot Margaret River
Salmon Bay Cabernet Merlot Margaret River

Napa Wine Train

Napa Valley Wine Train – California USA
By Nagib Georges Araman

For a memorable dining experience while traveling through an awe inspiring landscape, hop aboard the Napa Valley Wine Train, and you will not be disappointed. Stretching 30 miles, the Napa Valley is situated in Northern California and is one of the top wine growing regions in the world. The Napa Valley Wine Train journey lasts for 3 hours, which is more than enough time to soak in the scenic views of the Napa Valley that is mainly composed of rolling hills and charming vineyards. The Wine Train mainly goes to the quaint town of St Helena and goes for a round trip around picturesque towns such as Rutherford, Yountville and Oakville.

Aside from traveling with utmost luxury, this journey is all about going back in time as you will travel on a beautifully restored vintage train while exploring the famous American wine country. Most of the cars were built in 1915 by the renowned Pullman Standard Company and were intended to be first class coaches for the Northern Pacific Railway. These days, the refurbished cars have retained their steel structure and come with modern features such as steam heat and electric lights. They are also furnished with velveteen fabric armchairs, Honduran mahogany paneling and brass accents to achieve a high degree of luxury and comfort.

But what makes Napa Valley Wine Train even more exciting is the fantastic dining experience that comes with the train ride. You can enjoy this experience in the form of a multiple course gourmet lunch or dinner. Meals are freshly prepared in the three on board kitchens on the train. Dining arrangements for lunch packages usually follow traditional rail seating. This means that you will share a table with another party. Although it is possible to book a table all for yourself and your companion, the option is limited to when you book the Gourmet Express Package.

If you are willing to pay more, you can have your meal in the Vista Dome, where all the tables are private. Dinner on board the Napa Valley Wine Train is an entirely different experience as the tables are private, the ambiance is more formal and the dishes are complemented with glasses of fine wine. If you want a romantic date night, then there’s no other ideal package than the Moonlight Escape excursion.

Meals can be enjoyed in the first or second seating section. In the first seating section, meals are served when the train goes to St Helena. You can choose between soup or salad which accompanies the main course of your choice. Your dining experience is completed with coffee and dessert, which you can enjoy in one of the lounges while train is heading back to Napa. If you choose the second seating section, you will have appetizers on the way to St. Helena, and then have your main course on the return trip. Some examples of main course meals include roasted beef tenderloin, coriander chicken breast and grilled salmon with potatoes.

Aside from having a nice gourmet meal, you will also enjoy great wine tasting opportunities at some of the premier wineries in the region as part of the train package. The Napa Valley Wine Train station is located on McKinstry Street, which is only a 5 minute- walk from downtown Napa, California.

http://yourbesttraveler.com TRANSFORMING THE WAY WE TRAVEL

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Wines From Argentina

Is A New Wine Country Destination On Your Bucket List? Maybe It’s Argentina?
By Steven Lay

Argentina is considered New World and is especially so in the world of wines. The beginnings of Argentina are traced to early Spanish explorers who founded settlements around 1520. Argentina has the second largest economy in South America. Over the past six decades they have struggled with economic issues but have never lost its attraction to people wanting to explore the path less traveled. But award winning wines from accomplished wine makers is changing how people look at Argentina.

Relative to the wine industry in Argentina of today, there are more than 26,000 registered vineyards. Of the 6 significant wine regions, Mendoza is the largest. Based upon acres in vines, Mendoza is approximately 70% larger than the second place (366,000 vineyard acres in Mendoza versus 116,000 in the San Juan region) and accounts for more than 70% of wine produced in Argentina. As a comparison, there are approximately 928,000 vineyard acres in California alone.

This arid climate, with a terroir dominated by Andean mountain soils and warm days and cold nights, make for great wines. With annual rainfall averaging less than 8 inches per year Mendoza relies on the snow melt in the Andes for vine irrigation. In the early 1800’s many European wine makers came to Argentina based upon ideal soil conditions, relative freedom from vine diseases, and available land. With most of the Mendoza vineyards at 2,600 to 5,000 feet above sea-level, this area is proving to be interesting as a case study on growing grapes at high elevations. This is especially true in the U.S. where, for example, the University of Nevada-Reno is interested in studying potential grape crops grown at high elevations. In some areas of Napa 2,200 feet in considered being high altitude.

Even at higher altitudes, the largest varietals planted in Argentina are: Malbec, Bonarda, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah Merlot, Chardonnay, and Tempranillo. All these are prominent varietals in Europe and the U.S.

All varietal wine grape production in the U.S. in 2014 was approximately 2.8 million tons and Argentina produced 2.1 tons. But the top 5 wine producers in the world are (in descending order): France, Italy, Spain, U.S. and Argentina. It is interesting to note, 2010 versus 2014, all of the top 5 wine producing countries had a decrease in production except for the U.S. and Argentina-both had 5% growth.

But why is this of any interest to wine drinkers? Is it important to note that France produces 22% of the world’s tonnage of wine grapes? From the viewpoint that most wine drinkers eventually start searching for new experiences in wine, then it is natural to explore new wines-not just wine from regions we are comfortable and accustomed with. The famous historic wines of the world are from France, Italy and Spain, but why not explore other wines that are new and different and offer new sensations (aromas and taste) and experiences. Argentina offers wines that have recently started coming onto the wine stage in America; primarily because the quantity and quality are meeting very high standards.

For too long Argentina produced wines for local consumption. Now, with new wineries and major commitments from large family wineries from Europe, quality is vastly improved and exporting is becoming more common, especially as production increases and exchange rates make for bargains. In addition, many wine drinkers have experienced the traditional Europe, Australia and New Zealand, winery visits, now they want something new. Further, many in the U.S. market are marketing the texture of terroir/AVA. Certainly, Argentina has a very unique terroir, so why not explore Argentina for their wine.

Terroir is talked about a great deal. California wineries are starting to really market their AVA’s on labels and promoting the wine’s character from specific AVA’s. Gerald Boyd, writing for the Press Democrat in Santa Rosa, CA comments, “Soil is one of three main components that make up the over-arching concept of terroir, the others being topography and climate. There are dozens of soil types scattered throughout the wine regions of the world. A few years back, scientists told me that in the Napa Valley alone there are 33 different soil series and more than 100 soil variations. That new knowledge about soil encouraged me to look further at the impact of terroir on wine quality.” Based upon that recommendation, maybe wine lovers should try a new terroir.

Until now, there were not a lot of good options to find quality Argentina wine at good prices. But, as the industry grows, more quality wines are coming to America from Argentina.

I submit that the wine and culinary tour industry has worked its magic relative to European wine experiences and has branched out to Australia and New Zealand; everyone knows of YellowTail, but not everyone knows much about Argentina and their wines. This is relatively new.

Michel Rolland is probably the most noted wine consultant in the world. He represents clients in all the major wine regions of the world. His consulting fees are shocking to some and yet reasonable to those wanting to produce wine that is descriptive and born of a particular region. All of this is to say, he has one of his Argentinean wineries in Mendoza and he produces both red and white wine.

Many of the newer and most exquisite wineries in Argentina have roots in America as well. Quite by accident the son of the Frito-Lay CEO, Herman Lay, comes from Texas and has built a very exclusive winery in Mendoza he named Andeluna. It is a 200,000 acre winery and hunting lodge in the foothills of the Andes.

Argentina is worth a visit if you have been to Napa/Sonoma and other wine centric parts unknown to anyone but you. They are 5 hours ahead of West Coast time and their summer is North America’s winter.

Mr. Lay started Image of Wine http://www.imageofwine.com to manufacture and sell high end wine accessories to corporations as gifts and branding items. These are items may be personalized.

All products are custom manufactured and recongnized for their quality. Inquiries are welcomed by calling: 702-289-4167.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Steven_Lay/1185168

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Argentinean Wine

Why Try Argentinean Wine? Why Not?
By Steven Lay

Every place in the world that produces wine has some unique characteristics that impact the aromas and flavors of their wine. Argentina’s most visual awe-inspiring feature is the backdrop of the Andes Mountains to the West. The Andes give most of the vineyards cool night winds and sun filled days; most importantly the Andes give the high altitude vineyards the irrigation from the snow melt in the summer.

Since the 1550’s have been vineyards in Argentina and since the late 16th century the Mendoza area has been recognized as a premier wine grape growing region. “But it wasn’t until 1880 that a French botanist planted the first French grape varieties in the area. Italian and Spanish premium varieties were similarly introduced by immigrant wine makers from those countries,” according the Argentina Wine Guide.

Like California’s San Joaquin Valley and the area around Sacramento, Mendoza would not now be world renown as a wine region without plentiful water; both areas are naturally arid. In addition, Mendoza is at a relatively high elevation relative to traditional vineyards; Mendoza ranges from 2,600 to 5,000 feet above sea level. The Andes provide the irrigation water during the hot summer months and cool breezes at night.

But Argentina is not new to the wine scene, New World by definition, but old world by way of wines. Argentina was originally colonized by the Spaniards but Europeans have followed in the past few hundred years and as a result the varietals that have adapted to the Argentina climate variables have a great deal of European influences. Malbec is the grape that has made Argentina famous, but there are others that are important. In addition to Malbec there are other successful reds: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, and Tempranillo. Chardonnay also enjoys great acceptance and growth in the white category.

The following is a recap of the growth in premium wine varietals denoted as a percent change over a 10 year period ending in 2006. Source: Argentina Wine Guide.

Varietal-REDS Chge 2005 vs 2000

Malbec

102%

Bonarda

41%

Cabernet Sauvignon

604%

Syrah

1,440%

Merlot

491%

Tempranillo

-02%

Pinot Noir (Pinot Negro)

500%

Barbera

-10%

Cabernet Franc

300%

Varietal-WHITES Chge 2005 vs 2000

Torront�s

0%

Chardonnay

4,000%

Chenin Blanc

-20%

Ugni Blanc (Trebbiano)

0%

Semillon

0%

Sauvignon Blanc

400%

Sauvignonasse (Sauvignon Vert)

0%

Riesling

-30%

The 6 provinces/regions account for Argentina’s wine industry and this inordinate growth in traditional European varietals.

The most important wine regions of the country are the provinces/regions of: Mendoza, San Juan, La Rioja, Salta, Catamarca, Rio Negro and the newest being Southern Buenos Aires. The Mendoza province produces more than 70% of the Argentine wine.

Growing Provinces Acres in Vines

Mendoza

366,210

San Juan

116,633

La Rioja

20,262

R�o Negro

7,166

Catamarca

5,930

Salta

4,695

Neuqu�n

2,471

Other provinces (total)

3,212

Over the past couple of decades I have noticed more Argentinean wine on the shelves. It appears that Argentina wine industry has been expanding and the subsequent surplus in wine is going into the export market. Contrary to early history, most Argentinean wine was not high quality and most was consumed in that market. Looking at the U.S. wine industry, a parallel set of circumstances exist whereby excess production of quality wines go to the export market-European Union’s 28 member market to be specific. That export market accounts for $622 million in sales and 40% of U.S. wine exports in 2015, according to the Wine Institute. The total wine export market for the U.S. was $1.61 billion.

Do not think Argentina is not serious about the importance of wine on the World stage and the economic impact it has on a relatively small country; approximately 25% the size of the U.S. Some of the newer wineries are architectural marvels and produce award winning wines that rival the finest in the World. The production technologies in newer Argentinean wineries are second to none. The industry is also being populated by major wine producers and wine makers famous in the U.S. and Europe.

Today, some well-known wine consultants have put their stakes in the ground in Mendoza; such as Michel Rolland from France and Paul Hobbs from Napa and Sonoma, California. Until his death in 2011 Ward Lay, his father was the founder of Frito-Lay, was the owner of a new start-up winery that produces award winning wines. The name of that winery is Andeluna.

Just like in the U.S. there are small family operated wineries and large conglomerates, but the majority realize that the focus must be on quality. With 1,300 wineries in Argentina, that compares to 6,225 in the U.S. (with 26,000 vineyards). With a small population, smaller land mass, and impressive production numbers it is impressive what Argentina’s wine industry has accomplished. It also explains why we will see more Argentinean wine.

Mr. Lay started Image of Wine http://www.imageofwine.com to manufacture and sell high end wine accessories to corporations as gifts and branding items. These are items may be personalized.

All products are custom manufactured and recognized for their quality. Inquiries are welcomed by calling: 702-289-4167.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Steven_Lay/1185168

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Finding Wine Deals

Wine Bottle Vinorama Wine Red Wine Cellar Wines

Finding The Best Wine And The Best Wine Deals, On A Budget
By Paul Earhart

Learning the Lingo

The wine industry may seem to have a language of its own but then its origins can be traced back many thousands of years when modern language was in its infancy. Pioneers of various wine making processes gave their names to production methods and the names of towns, villages and grape growing regions were adopted as the names for various types of wine, with the Champagne region of France perhaps being one of the most famous. Learning a little terminology can help you immeasurably when researching your wine offers. Although we are only scratching the surface here, the following terms may be of use:

Appellation – The region of a country where particular wines are produced such as the Languedoc region of southern France or the Veneto region of north-eastern Italy.

Balance – The levels of acidity, fruit flavour/scent, tannin etc. in a particular wine. This tends to be more of an individual perception as everyone’s tastes and sense of smell is slightly different.

Chaptalization – The process of introducing sugar to grapes which are already fermenting with the aim of increasing the alcohol content of a wine.

Herbaceous – An aroma or flavour associated with wine where the grapes are grown in a cool climate, either on higher slopes or further north of the equator.

Kabinett – A German phrase used to describe high quality wine associated with the driest German Rieslings.

Legs – An enthusiasts term used to describe how the liquid adheres to the inside of a glass when it has been swirled inside the glass or tasted.

Nose – Also referred to as bouquet and used to describe a wine’s particular aroma.

Reserve – A term of American origin used to describe a high quality wine.

Steely – A term used to describe wine with high acidity that has not been aged in the barrel. Also described as crisp.

Tannins – Phenolic plant compounds. Grape tannins are found mostly in the skins and grape pits. Tannins are sharp-tasting and give structure to the wine. In more aged liquids, the tannins die off and the liquid becomes less sharp.

Vintage – Often mistakenly used as a term to describe a wine of great age, the term actually refers to a particular year or harvest in the wine business. All bottles have a vintage, be it 1895 or 2014.

There are, of course, many more terms used in the industry but through introduction to a few, you will invariably encounter and learn more. Do a little research and read some reviews written by budget wine connoisseurs with reference to the 5 S’s (see, swirl, sniff, sip and savour).

Organised Tastings.

High street and on-line wine wholesalers and local off licences are always holding regular tasting events to encourage new customers. What better way to discover new wines, taste them and then find out about which of your favourites are currently featured in great wine offers and promotions at your local shop or supermarket, or on-line? All you need to do is ask in a store or do some on-line research to find out about dates and venues. Very often you may discover a new varietal that you particularly like and have never even tried before.

Make a list of your favourite varietals so that you can keep an eye out for them, whether you’re shopping on the high street or on-line.

Research On-line Offers

The internet is a wonderful mine of information and, if you’re working to a fixed budget, there are a myriad of websites with reviews for wine in certain price brackets. This is most useful if you’re buying wine online for an event. Many of these websites have a simple calculator which can help you to work out how many bottles you need to order depending upon the expected number of guests. On-line wholesalers don’t have the overheads of many high street retailers and so may be able to produce a great wine offer for you. It is often well worth getting in touch via the website contact page and speaking to a sales representative for your chosen on-line supplier. They may be able to let you in on a little insider knowledge about future offers and dealing with people on a personal level can often lead to a more favourable business relationship.

Offers In Emerging Wine Regions

You may find that you can locate great wine offers by finding out a little about emerging grape growing regions which are not as well-known as Mendoza in Argentina or Napa Valley in California. South eastern UK vineyards are gaining a good reputation amongst enthusiasts as are the vineyards of Mallorca, Spain. You may find a particular varietal from one of these regions that you enjoy and consequently come across a great wine offer as vineyard owners seek to promote their new range of wines and win over new customers.

You may also discover new varietals that hail from very well-known growing regions around the world where the producer is trying to gain a foothold for their new product in the marketplace by offering great wine deals in an effort to spread the word amongst wine drinkers.

Buying Wine in Bulk

As with any product when bought in bulk, you can benefit even more from great wine offers if you buy more of it. It may be well worth your while to find out if any friends, colleagues or associates have a need for a large quantity of wine in the near future so that you can both benefit from big discounts by approaching the supplier with a much larger order quantity. If you have a reasonably frequent requirement for purchasing wine in bulk, why not try joining a syndicate? These groups will usually have members with a good amount of expertise with regards to finding offers and they can organise large orders at discounted prices and also offer sound advice.

Searching for Offers in Supermarkets and Off Licences

There are always great offers in most supermarkets or high street off licences and wine merchants, but there will be more offers featuring a wider variety of wines in the run up to seasonal celebrations such as Christmas or other special events throughout the year. As a rule of thumb, you are probably going to be better off selecting the wine with the biggest discount rather than the least expensive, as the discounted wine may usually be in a price bracket that would put it outside your selection list if it were full price and you may be missing out on a treat.

Pop into your local supermarket, make some notes about the discounts on offer, then do a little research on-line. You may find that the supermarket’s website has some reviews by experts and customers to assist you in making your final decision. You could even purchase a selection of the discounted wines if you are then intending to buy a larger quantity, so that you can try them and get some opinions from friends and family before deciding which wine offers to go for.

Offers in Cash & Carries

A local cash and carry would be an excellent place to look for wine offers if you need to buy in bulk. They don’t all offer access to the general public, some are purely for business owners looking to supply their shops or restaurants, but many will happily open an account for anyone whether they own or business or not. Many employers will also offer schemes to their employees which grant you access to a cash and carry. It’s worth asking your HR department about this, especially if you work for a large employer.

General Wine Buying Guidance

Finally, the following is some general advice about buying and drinking wine, such as how to store your wine or how to pair wine with food.

Storing Wine

A bottle of wine should remain perfectly drinkable for up to 5 days especially if kept in the fridge or in a nice, cool place. You won’t need to discard it if you haven’t finished the bottle on the first day.

Wine should be kept in a cool environment to stop it from degrading, especially if bought in bulk and then stored for a period of time. Keep the temperature as consistent as possible between 4 and 20 degrees centigrade. Experts recommend that corked wine bottles should be stored at an angle so that the wine is always in contact with the cork. You could store boxes on their sides to do this. Bottles with a screw cap can be stored upright.

Screw Caps Versus Corks

Modern wines come with both options and it certainly doesn’t differentiate between higher and lower quality wines. It’s more about manufacturer preference and bottling plant set up. A lot of producers switched from traditional corks to either plastic alternatives or screw caps to prevent the wine from becoming “corked” – where the cork degrades and spoils the liquid.

Don’t Take Risks With Offers

Stay with what you like. Just because you spot a wine offer on a different wine from the varietals that you would normally drink and the bottle has a fantastic label, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will enjoy the wine. A rash, on the spot decision could mean disappointment. Always do your research.

Happy bargain hunting!

For great wines and wine advice visit the Premier Estates Wine website or call and speak to a member of the team.

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Making Great Wine At Home

Home Winemaker’s Inner Circle

Homemade wine making is fast becoming very popular across the world. There are several reasons for this.

The biggest one is that the cost to transport that yummy nectar from where they grow, harvest, and ferment it is going up right along with the cost of fuel. There’s no two ways around it – we are about to see bottles of wine at the grocery store and wine shops double.

In the last year, there has been a flurry of “How To” guides crop up around the internet. All of the guides are helpful and at least can get a beginner started.

The truth is, you can make high quality wine, award winning wine, at home, in a 5 gallon food bucket.

Some preparation and materials are required. You have to at least have a hydrometer. You need at least the 5 gallon bucket. AND – you need some kind of near air tight secondary fermentation vessel. In the industry we call this a “carbouy”.

There are very inexpensive airlocks and some plastic tubing to round out the equipment.

Some chemicals may be required as well. Yeast is an obvious first one (not really a chemical but a dormant microbe). Citric acid, potassium sorbate, metabisulfate, campden tablets, pectin enzyme and a few others are pretty common.

The biggest secret in home wine making is: get the good stuff to start with.

There are actually vineyards that will sell small quantities of grapes or even crushed grapes and juices, fresh from the vineyard. Although these are hard to locate, they do exist. I have found at least one wine making guide that lists these sources.

Aside from the money savings (you can make wine for about 25 cents a bottle), there is the actual enjoyment of making something that you can drink! If your batch comes out really good, you will be calling all your neighbors and friends to come and give it a try.

Cheers and happy wine making!

Making Wine At Home Is Easy – If – You Know The Right Steps To Take. This Member’s Only Site For Homemade Wine Gives You All The Secrets To Produce Delicious, Fine Wine:

Making Wine At Home


Home Winemaker’s Inner Circle

Home Winemaker’s Inner Circle

Home Winemaker’s Inner Circle

So – you have decided that you want to try your hand at making some wine. This article will describe the basic steps and some of the pitfalls to avoid to make sure your first batch turns out good enough to drink.

First things first – how much do you want to make?

I recommend at least 5 gallons. Why? Because beginning home wine makers just cannot wait to taste what they have made. In addition, 5 gallons is only 25 bottles. So you’ll get the batch finished, and then you will try a bottle or 2 or 3. Then you’ll wait a week and try a few more bottles. Sooner than later, it will all be gone before it has a chance to age and get really good.

If you just want to do something quick and simple, you could do a gallon in a plastic milk jug. The drawback is, once you have tasted it a few times – it’s all gone and you’ll have to start over.

With 5 gallons – you just might be tempted to let a few of the remaining bottles age. Believe it or not, the biggest mistake beginning winemakers make is not letting their wine age in the bottle. The difference in taste is, to put it mildly, AMAZING.

The next step is to decide which type of juice you want to ferment. Grape juice, cranberry juice, muscadine, and cherry are all good starter choices. The first 3 should produce a rather normal tasting wine while cherries usually will give you a sweeter wine. Of course, you can always add sugar to sweeten your wine after it is stabilized and has stopped fermenting.

The next step is to completely sterilize all of the containers and equipment you will be using. Some people use extremely hot water, others recommend using a sanitizer. I like the sanitizer because you do not have to scald yourself with the hot water. The sanitizing solution should be poured over everything and should make contact with all surfaces. Then you just rinse everything off with hot water.

Put your juice in your 5 gallon bucket – that’s the next step. BUT – it’s not time to put your yeast in yet.

We first want to sterilize our “must” or our juice. You can do this with 4 Campden Tablets. These are sulfite tablets that will get rid of any type of bacteria that could be present in the juice. Crush the tablets and then dissolve them in some warm water and then pour them in your juice or “must”. Let this sit overnight while the sulfites do their work.

24 hours later, you are ready to sprinkle in or “pitch” your yeast.

The type of yeast you decide to use is really a question that is beyond the scope of this article. However, I’ll say that there are hundreds of different yeast strains for literally thousands of different uses. For our first batch, we can just use the bakers yeast that you can easily find at the grocery store. Later, and after some research, you will probably want to use one of the specialized strains.

Now – wait 7 days and watch. you will want to cover your bucket with a cloth towel or even put on a lid with an airlock in place. The wine will be perfectly safe during the fermentation stage because it will give off lots of Carbon Dioxide. The Co2 will protect your wine from the oxygen in the air.

Once the 7 days has passed, siphon off the wine from the bucket into another bucket or into a glass “carboy”. These can be found online or at your local wineshop. When you are doing the siphoning, you will want to get as little of the gunk on the bottom of the bucket as possible. This gunk is called “lees” and is made up of dead yeast. Wine that sits on top of the dead yeast sometimes can develop an “off” flavor.

Once your wine has been transferred into what is called your “secondary fermenter”, then you will want to put an airlock in place and just let it sit for about a month. There’s a song about this part – “The Waiting is the Hardest Part”. It’s true. Every budding home winemaker just cannot wait to taste the stuff – but – don’t do it. It surely won’t hurt you but during this month it is still fermenting. The wine isn’t finished yet. Be Patient.

After the month is up, you will want to transfer it back to your bucket, again making sure that you leave the gunk on the bottom. The process of transferring the wine from one vessel to another is called “racking”. Why? That’s something I am going to research for another article.

You are just about there. Theres only one thing left to do and that is to add a “stablizer” to your wine. A stabilizer inhibits yeast reproduction. In essence, it stops yeast from doing it’s thing. Part of what happens during yeast growth and reproduction is that it releases Co2 gas. If that is happening after you bottle the wine, you will get popped corks or exploded bottles or both. So – put in the stabilizer, stir the wine well, and then return it to your Secondary Carboy fermentation vessel. Be sure and clean out the secondary and sterilize it before you do.

Now, all you have to do at this point is wait until the wine clears. Gravity is your friend here. Of course, it won’t hurt a bit to bottle cloudy wine. But if you wait another month, it should be crystal clear. The clearing process is another subject that you can find a great deal of information on in other guides and books and I suggest you read up on this subject when you get a chance.

Bottling time! All you have to do is make sure your bottles are clean and sanitized and just siphon the wine into the bottles. Corking the bottles can be a little difficult and i highly recommend you get some king of corker. Again, these are available online or at your local wine shop.

Now – BE PATIENT and let the wine sit in the bottle for 6 to 9 months. The longer the wine ages, the better it will taste – I guarantee it. Happy winemaking!

Making Wine At Home Is Easy – If – You Know The Right Steps To Take. This Member’s Only Site For Homemade Wine Gives You All The Secrets To Produce Delicious, Fine Wine:

Making Wine At Home


Home Winemaker’s Inner Circle

Great Wine From Around The World

Wine Bar Bottle Of Wine Bottle Alcohol Shelf

Great Wine From Around The World – 123–Wine.com


More info on wines can be found by selecting the different styles, or offerings:

White Wines:

Chardonnay
Chardonnay History
Choosing Chardonnay
Napa Chardonnay
Chardonnay Grape

Pinot Grigio
Pinot Grigio Wine From the Pinot Gris Grape
Pinot Grigio Wine – Why The Wine Experts Are Wrong
Pinot Grigio Wine From the Pinot Gris Grape
Pinot Grigio: Italy’s Gift To the Wine-Drinking World

Sauvignon Blanc
Riesling
Champagne

Red Wines:

Cabernet Sauvignon
The Best of Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
7 Catchy Cabernet Blends With Refined Elegance
The Top 3 Merlot Cabernet Sauvignon Wines
Cabernet Sauvignon – A Truly International Grape

Pinot Noir
Spotlight on a Varietal – Pinot Noir
Pinot Noir: Your Sweet Choice
Additional Facts About Pinot Noir
Everything You Need to Know About Pinot Noir

Syrah
The Difference Between Syrah and Shiraz
Things You Should Know About Shiraz Wine
Syrah and Shiraz Wine: What’s the Difference?
Knowing the Flavors of Shiraz Wine

Zinfandel
The California Red – Zinfandel
Carol Shelton, the Queen of Zin!
The Life and Times of Red Zinfandel
Zinfandel Wine Tasting

The Total Wine System

the total wine system


The Total Wine System

The Total Wine System Is A Complete Step-by-step System With 3 Ebooks & 1 Audio Book. Everything From Grape Growing To Harvesting Grapes To Making Your Own Homemade Wine. Our Free 10 Part Mini E-course Will Show You How-to Create Your Own Homemade Wine!

Here’s just a taste of what you’ll discover…

A complete guide to selecting the perfect location for and setting up your vineyard.

The 4 factors you MUST consider before you plant your grapes.

The types of grapes you plant determine the type of wine you’ll eventually have. Learn how to determine which grapes are best for you!

Learn the single most important factor that determines the quality of your wine grapes and how to preserve it!

The importance of three climate factors in growing grapes.

The more than 40 types of grapes that are suitable for wine making.

The 5 essential aspects of ensuring healthy, vibrant grapes (and in turn delicious wine). Without these, your venture just can’t succeed.

An entire chapter devoted to vineyard care, starting with the first year of cultivation.

The 5 most efficient ways to control weeds in your vineyard.

A complete guide to disease and pest control practices for your vineyard.

Vital information on vineyard design and layout.

The 5 basic sure-fire steps to creating a perfect bottle of wine.

A list of all the necessary tools you’ll need for wine making.

A complete list of all the wine making ingredients you’ll need for the process.

An entire chapter devoted to harvesting grapes for the wine making process.

A crash course on the role acidity plays in the ultimate taste and success of your wine.

All about the process of alcoholic fermentation, including a guide to its two essential ingredients.

What malolcatic fermentation is and the effects it has on wine.

The importance of racking and what it ultimately means to the quality of your wine.

How oxygen affects the taste of your wine.

An entire chapter devoted to the two principle methods of producing white wines.

The variety of sweeteners you can use in your wine making process and those you can’t!

An entire chapter devoted solely to the creation of red wines from the picking of the grapes to the final process.

The two types of wine presses and which one is the better choice for you.

How to properly transfer pressed wine to your storage vessel and why “settling” is an essential part of the process.
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The Total Wine System